Reports & Leaflets

Social Propection Denied: The Impact of the Habitual Residency Condition on Migrant Workers

Social Propection Denied: The Impact of the Habitual Residency Condition on Migrant Workers
INTRODUCTION
Effective from May 1st 2004, the Irish government introduced the Habitual Residence Condition (HRC) as an additional criterion for qualifying for social assistance payments, Child Benefit (CB) and access
to emergency accommodation.  Migrant workers experiencing hardship due to the implementation of the HRC are approaching the MRCI, and other Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs), for advice and support.  This report explores the unintended impact of the Habitual Residence Condition policy.
Methodology
The methodology consisted of:
The development of case studies on the HRC and migrant workers;
Meetings with MRCI staff, and telephone interviews with NGOs in Longford, Cork and Galway and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul (SVP);
A meeting with the Habitual Residence Condition Unit in the Department of Social and Family Affairs (DSFA);
Telephone interviews with the Supplementary Welfare Allowance Policy Section, DSFA & a Community Welfare Officer;
Sourcing data on the implementation of the HRC from the DSFA.

 
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